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Phenix Timer Programming
Description
ProductThe Phenix Programmer Software provides a graphical interface for programming timers. The software is available for free. Phenix timers have a flexible program structure to fit almost every application. A timer program consists of lists of commands that are issued to the timer device. A command is the desired output(s) state and length of time to maintain the output(s) in that state. For example, turn on the output for 2 seconds.

Commands are listed from top to bottom and are grouped into sequences. Sequences are listed from left to right and are associated with an event that starts the sequence. Events vary depending on the timer device but every device can be programmed when the power is first applied, known as the "On Power" event.
Command Sequence Sample
Sample Program

When the power is applied to the device, this sample program will turn on the output for 2 seconds, then turn off the output for 2 seconds, and then continuously repeat this pattern. A program is created using the New Program button located on the tool bar.
Getting Started
A new program is created from the New Program button New Program Button located on the tool bar. The Open Program Button Open Program Button loads an existing program and the Save Program button Save Program Button saves the current program to a file.

After clicking on the New Program Button, a list containing all the programmable Phenix devices will be displayed. Timer hardware differs depending on the device and programming the device may function incorrectly if the wrong device is selected. Once the device has been selected, the Create button will create a blank program and then display a list of available events.

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Program Events
Product An event is an action associated with the sequence of commands. When an event occurs, the timer will execute the first command associated with the event. Some events include "On Power", "On Input", and clock events, such at 08:00:00 on Monday. A command sequence may have multiple events.

Once a program has been created, a list of available events will be displayed. New events can also be added to a program from the New Event Button Add Event Button located on the tool bar. To change the events that are associated with a command sequence, click on the Edit Event Button Edit Event Button also located on the toolbar.

When an event occurs, the timer executes the first command in the sequence. The event will interrupt any command currently being executed. For example, if a one hour interval has been running for 15 minutes, the timer will break from that interval and execute the first command in the new event's sequence. If the same event occurs more than once consecutively, for example a switch input is pressed twice in a row, the timer can be programmed to skip commands. This feature allows logic to be programmed into the timer. See Consecutive Events for more information.

On Power Event
The On Power event occurs when the operating voltage is first applied to the timer. This event is most commonly used to execute the same command sequence whenever there is power on the timer. Programming a timer using the On Power event, it is required to cycle the power on the the timer to execute the event.

Input Events
An input event can be a momentary switch or digitally coded input. For example, the 9262 timer has wired connections for up to four momentary switch inputs. For timers with a coded input, a momentary switch connected to the input is referred to as "Pulse Input." Input events are most commonly used to start a command sequence from an external momentary switch.

Real Time Clock Events
Edit Event Button
Real Time Clock Event Sample

Timers with real time clock(RTC) hardware are able to start a command sequence at a specific moment. This event is only available on with timers with RTC. Programs that do not use RTC events will automatically disable the RTC hardware within the timer, reducing the power consumption of the timer.

A RTC event is defined by a time of day, represented in military time with the format HH:MM:SS. The event may be limited to only execute on specific days of week. The depressed buttons, labeled "SMTWTFS", represent which days the event will apply, from Sunday through Saturday.

The clock on the timer is set from the remote programmer by selecting the "Sync time with system time" option from the USB programming dialog. See USB Programming for more information. When the power is reset on the timer, the clock is reset to Sunday at 00:00:00. It is possible to use this reset feature to set events relative to when the timer is powered. For example, setting the event time 04:00:00 will start an event 4 hours after the timer is powered.

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Command Sequences
A command sequence is a list of commands, also referred to as intervals, to be executed by the timer when an event occurs. The events associated with the sequence are listed above the commands. Each row below the events represents a single command.

Command Sequence Sample
Command Sequence Sample

Commands are executed from top to bottom and are automatically repeated. The first command is executed when the bottom most command is completed. When a command is executed, the output of the timer is set to state displayed in the right most column, ON representing the output is energized and OFF representing the output is de-energized. After the output has been set, the timer begins to countdown the interval.

The interval is in the format HH:MM:SS.S. The software will attempt to convert the text in the interval field into a valid time. Text that was not able to be converted into an interval will be marked as invalid by changing the background of the text field to red. The left most column defines which commands will be executed when the same event occurs more than once consecutively. For most applications, this column can be ignored. For more information, see Consecutive Events.

An interval of time 00:00:00 is referred to as a HOLD. A hold interval instructs the timer to set the output of the command but do not countdown an interval, thereby holding the output continuously in the same condition until another event occurs. The HOLD feature is useful to make a single shot timer by stopping the timer at the end of a command sequence. This feature can be used with real time clock events. For example, by setting a hold OFF event in the evening, the timer can run all day then shutdown at night.

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Consecutive Events
When an input event occurs more than once consecutively, the timer can be programmed to skip commands in the sequence. This feature allows for logic to be programmed into the timer. This feature only effects the timer's behavior when using an external input, such as a momentary switch. The command flow is represented by a connecting bar along the left most column. Clicking on the bar will connect and disconnect commands from the input flow.

Consecutive Event Example
Sample Flow Program

In the sample flow program, the sequence on the left has only a flow connection on the first command, a one minute ON command. The second command, a HOLD OFF command, is not connected to the flow. When an input 1 event occurs, the first command in sequence will be executed. The output will be set to ON and a one minute interval is loaded into the timer. If an input 1 event occurs during the one minute interval, the timer will jump to the next command connected to the flow. In this case, the HOLD OFF command will be skipped and the first command will be executed again.

The command sequence on the right has the flow connected to the first command, two minutes ON, and the second command, a HOLD OFF command. In the example on the right, when an input 2 event occurs the first command is executed. The timer output is set ON and a two minute interval is loaded. If an input 2 command occurs during the two minute interval, the timer will jump to the next command connected to the flow. In this case, the timer will jump to the HOLD OFF command. The output will be set to OFF and the timer will wait at this command until another event occurs.

The left command sequence causes the timer to act as an idle shutoff timer. The timer will turn ON for one minute when the input is activated and will refresh the one minute interval every time the input is activated. The sequence on the right, however, will toggle between ON and OFF every time the input is activated.

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USB Programming
Product After a timer program has been created, the timer settings can be transfered into a USB timer or USB remote programmer using the PC's USB interface. Clicking on the "USB Programming" button, located in the lower right corner, will display the USB Programming dialog. Phenix USB devices connected to the computer will be automatically detected and displayed in the dialog. The device number and version will be displayed. Also, the current time programmed in the device will displayed, when applicable.

To program a USB device, click on the box to the left of the device or click on the "Program All" button to program all the USB devices currently connected. A check mark will appear inside the box to the left of the USB device to indicate the program was transfered successfully. The transfer may occur very quickly. As long as the box to left is checked, the device has been successfully programmed.

The software automatically knows which Phenix timers have real time clock(RTC) hardware. When programming for a timer with RTC, a "Sync time with system time" check box will be displayed at the bottom of the USB Programming dialog. When this box is checked, the current time will be transfered into the USB device. The time will be displayed along with the device model and version number. Whenever a USB remote programs a timer, the clock information will also be transfered to the timer. If the "Sync time with system time" box is not checked, the remote will only transfer timer settings and leave the clock in the timer unchanged. Once the remote has been programmed, the setting can be transfered to the timer. See section, Programming Timers.

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Screen Programming
Product After a timer program has been created, the timer settings can be transfered into a screen remote programmer, model 9211. Clicking on the "Screen Program" button, located in the lower right corner, will display the screen programming dialog. The screen programming dialog will blink two regions on the screen. The regions will alternate between white and black and send a coded sequence to the remote. The remote can read this code directly from the screen. The screen programming is much slower than USB programming. For large programs, it's recommended to use the USB programmer. The screen programming is intended as an inexpensive alternative to USB and is available on older systems without USB.

To transfer the timer setting to the 9211, press the touch switch on the remote to wake the remote from power saving mode. The 9211 will blink the LED once every three seconds to indicate it is ready to read from the screen. While in this mode, hold the remote up to the computer screen, positioning the remote in the center of the screen programming dialog and about a half an inch away from the computer screen. Click on the "Start" button. After a three second delay, the black and white regions will alternate rapidly.

After the regions have alternated a few times, the indicator light on the remote will turn ON solid. Its is important to keep the remote steady for the duration of the programming. Ensure that the touch switch is facing up and outer sensors are each over a region. A progress bar will indicate how much time is left for the transfer to complete. When the progress bar reaches the end, the indicator light on the remote will blink rapidly. If the light does not blink rapidly at the end of the transfer or turns OFF before the end, the transfer did not complete successfully. Once the remote has been programmed, the setting can be transfered to the timer. See section, Programming Timers.

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Programming Timers
Product Once a remote has been programmed, the settings can be transfered into a timer device. The remote programmer operates like a short range flash light. The center programming infrared LED transmits a cone of infrared(IR) light which is detected by the IR sensor on the timer. The IR sensor detects optimally less than an inch away. The IR sensor is located differently depending on the timer. Check the timer layout for sensor position. Some IR sensors are located in a black tube covered by a small screw. Be sure to remove the screw before programming.

To program a timer, locate the IR sensor and remove the cover screw, if any. The timer requires power to be programmed. Timers operating on battery backup power can be programmed without needing to apply the operating voltage. Position the remote's IR transmitter over the IR sensor on the timer. Center the transmitter over the sensor as best as possible less than an inch away. Being closer does not effect the transmission, but too far away will cause program transfer to fail. Once the remote is positioned, press the touch switch on the remote. The indicator light on the remote will turn on solid while transmitting. When the remote completed the transmission, the indicator light on the remote will blink rapidly. Also, the indicator light on the timer will blink rapidly when a program has been successfully received.

Smaller programs will take less time to transfer and may appear as just a blink of the indicator light. However, when the remote has finished transmitting, the indicator light will always blink rapidly multiple times. If the indicting light on the timer does not blink after the remote finished transmitting, the transfer was not successful. When programming a timer with the "On Power" event, cycle the power on the timer for the new program to start.

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Get Latest Version
Phenix Programmer Software
Sections
Getting Started
Program Events
Command Sequences
Consecutive Events
USB Programming
Screen Programming
Programming Timers
Sample Programs
Sample Timer Programs


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